Cell reprogramming discovery may lead to treatments for eye diseases

Cell reprogramming discovery may lead to treatments for eye diseases

The researchers, led by Bo Chen, an associate professor of ophthalmology at Yale University School of Medicine in New Haven, CT, report their work in the journal Cell Reports. The retina at the back of the eye contains many types of cell, including the retinal neurons that process visual images and help us to see, and support cells called glial cells. The most common type of glial cell in the eye of mammals is the…

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Exercise does not reduce multiple sclerosis risk

Exercise does not reduce multiple sclerosis risk

Some researchers have theorized that regular physical activity reduces the risk of developing multiple sclerosis. A new analysis demonstrates that, as a preventative measure, exercise does not appear to have the desired effect. Recent research clears up the debate about physical exercise and MS risk. Although the exact number of people with multiple sclerosis (MS) in America is not known, there are estimated to be 2.3 million people affected worldwide. MS is a varied condition…

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HIV vaccine steps closer with new insights into broadly neutralizing antibodies

HIV vaccine steps closer with new insights into broadly neutralizing antibodies

Scientists reveal new insights into the human body’s ability to produce broadly neutralizing antibodies to HIV that promise to open new avenues for vaccine development. Scientists say their new information on broadly neutralizing antibodies may bring us closer to an HIV vaccine. Once the HIV enters the body, the immune system starts to produce antibodies to fight the pathogen. Generally, the antibodies produced are specific to the particular strain of HIV. However, research reveals that…

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Economic hardships pave the way to cognitive aging

Economic hardships pave the way to cognitive aging

The negative implications of poverty on health have received a wealth of research over recent years. A new study, published this week, charts the cognitive impact of poverty on people aged 18-30 across a 25-year period. Poverty’s negative impact on cognitive abilities strikes at a younger age than previously thought. Due to a steady rise in socioeconomic inequality, many Americans are likely to experience poverty. According to an Associated Press survey, a staggering 4 out…

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ALS: Breakthrough discovery of destructive brain cells

ALS: Breakthrough discovery of destructive brain cells

Pioneering research led by The University of Sheffield in the United Kingdom reveals that a type of cell in the central nervous system that usually supports motor neuron function can “go rogue” and destroy motor neurons in people with ALS. ALS is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects nerve cells in the brain and the spinal cord. Motor neurons – nerve cells that form a pathway for the brain to send instructions to muscles –…

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Preterm, low-birth-weight babies more likely for women with hearing loss

Preterm, low-birth-weight babies more likely for women with hearing loss

Pregnant women with hearing loss may be more likely to give birth prematurely or have low-birth-weight babies. This is the conclusion of new research published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine. [A pregnant woman looking at her bump] Researchers suggest women with hearing loss are at greater risk of having preterm or low-birth-weight babies. In the United States, around 15 percent of adults have some degree of hearing loss. Lead investigator Dr. Monika Mitra,…

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